Bike Across The USA – June 13

We woke up in the trees and walked the last 6 miles into Roggen to mail away Rebecca’s bag and wait for Brian to meet us with the bike.

image

The fog was a nice break from the heat

Roggen was a pretty sad town with a restaurant that wasn’t open, a post office, and a really overgrown park. We wrapped athletic tape around Rebecca’s bag and mailed it to Tim’s parents with our sleeping bags inside. Saying goodbye to a bag that has been carried so far is a little difficult, but also rewarding. Also, it smelled really bad….

image

This part of Colorado is surprisingly empty

We walked over to the park to wait for Brian and charged our phones in the pavilion while we suffered in the summer heat.

image

Our pavilion

When he arrived we decided it was best to get a ride to Fort Morgan, east lunch together, and then head out to Brush. Brush has a free campground in the city park and it would give Rebecca a safe 10 miles to get used to her bike. We ate at a surprisingly good diner/Mexican food place and said our goodbyes after packing up the bike.

image

Saying goodbye in the parking lot

Rebecca had to adjust to biking, with about 35lbs on the back of a binge everything is a little harder. She stopped by Wal-Mart to buy us sheets to sleep with and biked on a small country road all the way to Brush. In Brush she set up the tent, bought bungee cords, and spent the next hour adjusting the bike seat to fit her.

image

Biking away!

Tim settled into a routine of walking by himself and noticed that a lot of barns have quilt patterns on the outside. We still aren’t sure what these are, so if anyone has ideas we’d love to hear them!

image

A quilt!

Tim met a cyclist biking across the country and traded stories with him on the road. Then made it into Brush, stopping at the grocery store to pick up salad for dinner. When Tim got into the campground, our camping neighbour invited us over to his family reunion that they hold in the park every year. So we enjoyed hot dogs and ice cream and ribs after eating our salad.

image

Brush, the town that deserves the exclamation point

We laughed that all of the chairs have an exclamation point after Brush on them, and we’re invited to the evening bonfire, which we turned down because we wanted to sleep a lot that night. But, we were offered breakfast with the family the next morning and we hoped to be able to take advantage of that. It is fun to randomly be invited into a family reunion where we get to meet a family that travels to Brush to camp out and spend three days getting to know each other again. Grandma Mountain, your family line is a friendly one, we’ll be back next June (well…not really).

Today we walked through:
Roggen
Fort Morgan
Brush!

Rebecca: 17,520 steps
Tim: 31,279 steps

1390 miles finished

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Bike Across The USA – June 13

  1. Cecily says:

    Hi guys! As your resident quilter, those quilt patterns are called barn quilts. They are put up by quilters, quilts groups/guilds, or community groups and form a trail or tour through a community. The owners of each barn choose the quilt block and each quilt block has it’s own meaning or history. I think the quilt block in the barn quilt pic you posted is called Rising Sun. This is not an excerpt from the exact quilt barn that you posted, but the same pattern on a barn in Iowa:
    “The sun is a symbol of growth, new life and prosperity. Settlers of the 19th century… relied on the sun for their livelihood and subsistence. The sun ensured the growth of crops. The sun powered the cycle of life. It turned the seasons and governed the weather. The rising sun reminds us of the promise of a new day after a time of turmoil and trouble.”

    Like

  2. Cecily says:

    BTW, here is a link to the Morgan County, CO quilt barn blog.
    http://mcbarnquilts.blogspot.com/
    Safe travels!!

    Like

  3. Marty McKnew says:

    Quilts were hung to guide folks on the “Underground Railway” for fugitive slaves. A rest stop along I-80 in Iowa has a great display and explanation. The practice of painting patterns on barns may be a carry over from this.

    Like

  4. rebeccatim says:

    Everyone has been so knowledgeable about these! I guess we should ask more questions!!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s